Home Scanner Recommendations  
Introduction
Digital Trunking Scanner Recommendations Conventional Scanner Recommendations
Analog Trunking Scanner Recommendations Wide-Band Scanner Recommendations
Radios With Popular Features

Trunking Scanner Poll

I threw together a quick survey to see what everybody owns, how they use their scanners, what features they want, and what they plan to purchase.
Sorry, there are no instant results but I will post daily results here.

 

Introduction

 

 
Do you want a simple scanner or a do-all traditional scanner?
True, simple may be relevant to your experience with scanners but there is now a class of scanners made for the novice enthusiast that allows you to just select the systems you want to scan, or enter a zip code and have the scanner find them, without having to worry about trunking, fleetmaps, talkgroups, sites, etc. You still have to figure out how to select the systems but it's not as hard as entering all the information you need to make the systems work in the scanner. This are made mainly for the 'set it and forget it' people who want to listen to scanners rather than try to figure out how to program them. In this case, the HomePatrol, PSR700 and PSR800 are the recommended scanners. They have their pros and cons just like the traditional scanners as well. The rest of my recommendation are for the full-fledged program-everything scanners that will allow you to fine tune your scanning preferences.

Do I need a Digital capable scanner?
If none of the systems you want to monitor are 'digital', (or won't be going digital soon [?]) don't buy a digital capable scanner for more than double the cost of a analog trunking scanner and wait for a digital system in your area. Digital scanning is still new and very awkward to program with the current scanners. Wait until the programming has been refined a little better/easier and until you really need one. Note that a lot of the newer digital trunking systems operate in the 700MHz band and not all of the older digital scanners will receive 700MHz.

Buy only what you need for the immediate future:
The
Radio Reference Database is a good place to see what there is in your area to scan. Digital systems are becoming more popular with many agencies. Trunking is here to stay but still not used everywhere. If you don't need trunking there are plenty of conventional and wide-band scanners out there that receive a whole lot better with better features. Rebanding is another issue. It may be years before it's fully implemented. By then there will be other newer scanners that have newer features. If you are not going to be monitoring any Motorola systems, don't worry about rebanding.

Don't just go looking for the latest and greatest scanner assuming it's what you need and will do everything you want (the HomePatrol for instance). Use the following information to select just what you need (or will need in the immediate future) to purchase a scanner. Many of the older scanners have nice features that the newer scanners have dropped.

For people
new to trunking scanners:
First, make sure you know what 'trunking' is all about. There is a good tutorial
here and more on my home page.

Use my Trunking Comparison Chart
to see which scanners offer what you want and/or need. To get more detailed info, go to Uniden's or Radio Shack's site and download the PDF manual for the scanner to see exactly what it does and how to program it. The Radio Reference Wiki is also a good place to get info. I also have Easier to Read Manuals on my main page for all of the newer popular scanners.
 
People will argue if you want performance buy Radio Shack GRE made RS models and the new GRE (PSR) models. Better quality sound, faster trunktracking, shorter squelch tails, clearer digital transmissions, brighter displays, the firmware is easier to upgrade, and the software available is more reliable. I've owned both Uniden and RS (GRE) models side-by-side in 4-6 states (about 2500 miles apart) and in all cases the RS models perform better receiving the frequencies. Now that's just my opinion. Actual results depend on your location, system/channels monitored, terrain, etc., and personal taste.

People will argue if you want features buy Uniden or Uniden made RS models. Fewer intermod problems, dynamic memory, 100 chs/sec (conventional) scan, SCAT EDACS trunking, more informative displays, changeable steps and receive modes, GPS Based Scanning, Bandscope mode, Start-up Configurations, CTCSS and (not or) DCS tone search, auto store (IDs and freqs), channel alerts, repeater reverse, computer control, I-call IDs, scan-search-ID/delay-resume, more priority channels, and better accessories sold with the scanners.

With cell towers everywhere now, the GREs tend to be more prone to overload than the uniden models, especially on 800MHz.

Radio Shack scanners will trunktrack faster (with multiple systems). Uniden scanners will scan conventional freqs faster. I have both and use the Unidens for searching, GPS compatibility, auto/quick store, tones, etc., and setup the GREs for monitoring what I find. Just my way of scanning.

Update:

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Uniden has unveiled 2 new scanners, The BCD436HP (HH) and BCD536HP (Base/mobile). They are basically a combination of the 396XT/996XT and the HomePatrol, allowing full programming control for the veterans and the ease of just being able to enter a zip code and scan for novices. GRE has been acquired by Whistler, maker of radar detectors for years, and has announced it will bring back some of the older GRE models for release in the first third quarter of 2014, and will eventually be adding newer models with competitive features.

Both companies are boasting new features so you may want to wait a while to see what comes out from both companies before you plunk down $500-$600 on a new digital scanner.

 
Digital Trunking Scanners -These are all rebandable, trunk LTR, VHF, and UHF systems, trunktrack and scan (conventional) at the same time, have attenuation per channel, AFS/Decimal EDACS ID display, power-on resume, weather alert, changeable receive modes per channel, alpha-tags, CTCSS and DCS, ID delay, CB band, Motorola Control Channel Only programming, and have a computer interface and/or control.
 
BCD436HP(HH):
Pros- A hand-held version of the
of the HP-1. Support for P25 Phase II and P25 X-2 TDMA, quick keys for Favorites Lists, Systems, Sites, and Departments. Includes most of the features from the BCD396XT plus the Radio Reference Database for the US and Canada on a 4 GB microSD card, allows you to select systems by zip code, gps coordinates, or auto locate. Location control can filter sites and departments with a range control. Selectable services types to scan, LED alert light, a 'Discovery' mode that will log new frequencies/IDs not found in the database, encryption muting, per channel delay setting, included software, up to 256 Favorites Lists, recording, playback, and instant replay for scan, search, Close Call, and Tone-Out modes, number tags for Favorites Lists, 64-character alpha tagging, GPS compatibility, selectable startup configuration, temporary and permanent "Avoids", signal meter, Multi-Site Trunking, radio IDs, I-call IDs, Motorola status bits, NAC, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert/priority, support for EDACS ESK systems, priority DND, an adjustable priority check interval with an adjustable number of channels to be checked, priority IDs with Preemptive Priority ID Scanning on Motorola analog systems, 3 'Search Keys' that allow you assign any (1) custom or service search, 'Close Call Only Mode', or a Tone-Out search to, scan/search resume; up to 30 sec. scan/search delay with up to 10 second negative delay, Military air, adjustable volume offset for each channel, repeater reverse, 'Quick search, broadcast screen with 10 custom screen bands, IF (intermediate frequency) exchange, Close Call with DND and Close Call Temporary Store, a low/middle/high brightness level for the display, computer interface, adjustable charge time for the batteries (1-14 hrs.), and Fire Toneout with Search now with 32 slots. Future: a trunked system analyzer that includes a reception status graph, an activity chart and log, LCN activity monitor, talkgroup converter, LCN channel finder, a Bandscope Mode, a frequency power plot, and a raw data output.

Cons- Secondary display information is very small in the display. Scanner needs to be off to charge the batteries. Not all 64 characters visible in the display. No power-on backlight.

BCD536HP(Base/Mobile):
Pros- Has all the features of the BCD436HP in a base/mobile version that
has the alert LED ring is around the scroll control. Future: a wi-fi dongle and app that allows connectivity to your smartphone or tablet, trunked system analyzer that includes a reception status graph, an activity chart and log, LCN activity monitor, talkgroup converter, LCN channel finder, a Bandscope Mode, a frequency power plot, and a raw data output.

Cons- E/Yes button is awkward to access when the USB cable is plugged in. Not all 64 characters visible in the display. Less 'receiving' information in the display than BCD436HP.
 

BCD396XT(HH):
Pros- An upgraded version of the
BCD396T with quite a few new features including 25,000 total channels/500 systems/500 IDs per system, Scan with Search, alpha tagging, the ability to number any system/channel/search (from 0-999), 7 display colors (blue, red, magenta, green, cyan, yellow, and white), visual alerts (flashing display), changeable default receive bands, GPS compatibility, dynamic memory, selectable startup configuration, a Bandscope Mode, signal meter, battery meter, pre-programmed systems, 500 (250 temporary + 250 permanent) search lockouts, Multi-Site Trunking, radio IDs, I-call IDs, Motorola status bits, NAC, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert/priority, support for EDACS ESK systems, control-channel data output, an adjustable priority check interval with an adjustable number of channels to be checked, priority IDs with Preemptive Priority ID Scanning on Motorola analog systems, priority plus IDs, priority plus scanning, 3 'Search Keys' that allow you assign any (1) custom or service search, 'Band Scope Mode', or a Tone-Out search to, scan/search resume; up to 30 sec. scan/search delay with up to 10 second negative delay, Military air, adjustable volume offset for each channel, repeater reverse, autostore, 'Quick search, broadcast screen with 10 custom screen bands, IF (intermediate frequency) exchange, Close Call with DND and Close Call Temporary Store, a low/middle/high brightness level for the display, computer interface/control, adjustable charge time for the batteries (1-16 hrs.), EDACS and Motorola patch tracking, Key-Safe Mode, the ability set a system as 'Private', and Fire Toneout with Search.

Cons- Scans multiple trunking systems with a 2 second delay. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels). No printed owner's manual; Manual only on CD or pdf. Very complicated to update the firmware. Awkward to reset the radio.

BCD996XT(Base/Mobile):
Pros- Has all the features of the BCD396XT in a base/mobile version.

Cons- Same as the BCD396XT. Manual only on CD or online.

PSR500/Pro-106/651/WS1040(HH)/PSR600/Pro-197/652/WS1065(Base/Mobile):
Pros-
Object Oriented Memory with 22 Scan Lists (20 regular lists, a Favorites list, and Skywarn list), 5 way navigation key to access special modes and programming options, Virtual Scanner Memory Management system; One V-Scanner folder can hold up to 1800 objects, meaning any combination of talkgroups, conventional channels, limit/service searches, and trunking systems; 21 folders; about 37,800 objects, Multi-Site Trunking with option to look for the site with the best received CC decode rate, 700MHz and 380MHz trunking, Military air, computer interface and control, QuickText allows you to program insertable text for tagging, object hit counts, FlexStep allows channel entries within 1.25 KHz steps, support for EDACS ESK systems, NAC programming, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, digital AGC, weather alert/priority, per channel or global attenuation, ID delay, priority IDs, patch tracking, the repeater finder tool, pre-programmed systems, Wide/Narrow/SCAT EDACS, I-call IDs, radio IDs, 'any' color LED alert, audio alerts, signal strength meter, battery meter, favorites scan list, 'Expert' settings, 'multiple' priority channels, Scan with Search, Spectrum Sweeper/Signal Stalker II, limit, service, and Stalker/Sweeper searches can be programmed as objects, 'Tune' search, temp/permanent lockout, Zeromatic search tuning, control-channel data output, TCXO (temperature controlled crystal oscillator) for frequency stability, and firmware upgrades. Many extra 'fine tuning' settings for scanning and especially digital trunking.

Cons-
talkgroup (tag or id) and system name alternate. Only 22 scan lists (vs. Uniden's 100 quick keys). Complicated menu features. Tiny keypad buttons; too close and too hard to press. The are extra 'save' steps you need to perform to get out of the menus after changes. Search ranges are still fixed steps.

PSR800/WS1080(HH):
Pros- An upgraded version of the PSR-700 with digital trunking,
X2 TDMA Support, and Phase II TDMA support. Contains the Radio Reference Database for the US and Canada on a microSD card, option in newest firmware (PSR800) to select systems by city, county, or zip code, and also select service types (US only); simplified keypad more like an MP3 player, included software, 201 scan lists (200 regular lists plus a Skywarn list), 20 scan sets, 200 virtual memories with V-Scanner II, an alert LED, LED flash pattern alerts, audio alerts, recording/playback of received objects, auto power-on, 4-way navigation key to access special modes and programming options, Multi-Site Trunking, digital AGC, NAC, encrypted talkgroup filtering, power-on password, 700MHz and 380MHz trunking, Military air, FlexStep allows channel entries within 1.25 KHz steps, support for EDACS ESK systems, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert/priority, per channel or global attenuation, site name in display, 70 cps scan rate, 80 steps/sec. search rate, ID delay, priority IDs, I-call IDs, radio IDs, patch tracking, Wide/Narrow/SCAT EDACS, signal strength meter, battery meter, 'multiple' priority channels, Spectrum Sweeper, Zeromatic search tuning, control-channel data output, IF/Discriminator Out, and USB power (as well as AC/DC).

Cons- Software needed to edit trunked systems and manage V-Scanner II folders.
No numeric keypad. Transferring to/from scanner is very slow. No printed owner's manual; pdf manual only.

HomePatrol(Desktop/HH):
Pros-
Not like a handheld or base model, it's more of a desktop scanner that sits on an included stand. It has a 3.5-inch diagonal color touch-sensitive LCD screen. Contains the Radio Reference Database for the US and Canada on a microSD card, allows you to select systems by city, county, zip code, or auto locate, selectable services types to scan, included software, up to 256 Favorites Lists, recording/playback of received transmissions, GPS compatibility, 37-character alpha tagging, temporary and permanent lockouts, signal meter, battery meter, Multi-Site Trunking, adjustable delay, ID delay, programmable radio IDs, I-call IDs, Motorola status bits, NAC programming, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert, audio channel alerts, support for EDACS ESK systems, control-channel data output, Military air, adjustable volume offset for each channel, auto power-off with weather alert or clock standby, digital AGC, per channel or global attenuation, site name in display, 100 cps scan rate, option to export a kml file to programs like Google Earth, and USB power (as well as AC/DC).

There is an 'Extreme' firmware version ($100 extra) that includes
the ability to program new systems, departments and channels without the need for the software, a trunked system analyzer that includes a reception status graph, an activity chart and log, LCN activity monitor, talkgroup converter, LCN channel finder, a Bandscope Mode, a frequency power plot, and a raw data output. A 'Discovery' mode that will log new frequencies/IDs not found in the database.

Cons- No printed owner's manual; pdf manual only. Too many confirmation steps when selecting options and settings. Lacks many traditional features like priority scanning, weather priority, Close Call, and service search.

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Analog Trunking Scanners -These are all rebandable, trunk LTR, VHF, and UHF systems, trunktrack and scan (conventional) at the same time, have attenuation per channel, AFS/Decimal EDACS ID display, power-on resume, weather alert, changeable receive modes per channel, alpha-tags, CTCSS and DCS, ID delay, CB band, Motorola Control Channel Only programming, and have a computer interface and/or control.
 
BC346XT(HH):
Pros- An upgraded version of the
BC246T with quite a few new features including 9000 total channels/500 systems/500 IDs per system, Scan with Search, visual alerts (flashing display), alpha tagging, the ability to number any system or channel within a system (from 0-999), GPS compatibility, selectable startup configuration, 500 (250 temporary + 250 permanent) search lockouts, Multi-Site Trunking, radio IDs, I-call IDs, Motorola status bits, dynamic memory, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert/priority, support for EDACS ESK systems, control-channel data output, priority IDs with Preemptive Priority ID Scanning, priority plus IDs, priority plus scanning, 3 'search' keys, scan/search resume, up to 30 sec. scan/search delay, adjustable volume offset for each channel, repeater reverse, autostore, 'Quick search, broadcast screen with 10 custom screen bands, changeable default receive bands, IF (intermediate frequency) exchange, Close Call with DND and Close Call Temporary Store, a low/middle/high brightness level for the display, computer interface/control, a Bandscope Mode, signal meter, battery meter, pre-programmed systems, adjustable charge time for the batteries (1-16 hrs.), EDACS and Motorola patch tracking, Key-Safe Mode, the ability set a system as 'Private', an owner's manual online or on CD only, memory lock, and Fire Toneout with Search.

Cons- Scans multiple trunking systems slow. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels). No Military air. No AGC. No printed owner's manual; Manual only on CD or pdf. Very complicated to update the firmware. Awkward to reset the radio.

BCT-15X(Base/Mobile):
Pros- An upgraded version of the BCT-15
with Police alert, the BearTracker Warning System, alert plus, 9,000 total channels/500 systems/500 IDs per system, Scan with Search, alpha tagging, the ability to number any system/channel/search (from 0-999), visual alerts (flashing display), changeable default receive bands, GPS compatibility, dynamic memory, selectable startup configuration, a Bandscope Mode, signal meter, pre-programmed systems, 500 (250 temporary + 250 permanent) search lockouts, Multi-Site Trunking, radio IDs, I-call IDs, Motorola status bits, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert/priority, support for EDACS ESK systems, control-channel data output, an adjustable priority check interval with an adjustable number of channels to be checked, priority IDs with Preemptive Priority ID Scanning on Motorola analog systems, priority plus IDs, priority plus scanning, only 3 'Search Keys' that allow you assign any (1) custom or service search, 'Band Scope Mode', or a Tone-Out search to, scan/search resume; up to 30 sec. scan/search delay with up to 10 second negative delay, Military air, adjustable volume offset for each channel, repeater reverse, autostore, 'Quick search, broadcast screen with 10 custom screen bands, IF (intermediate frequency) exchange, Close Call with DND and Close Call Temporary Store, a low/middle/high brightness level for the display, computer interface/control, EDACS and Motorola patch tracking, Key-Safe Mode, the ability set a system as 'Private', and Fire Toneout with Search.

Cons- Scans multiple trunking systems slow. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels). Enabled systems/groups don't stay in the bottom of the display. No AGC. No printed owner's manual; Manual only on CD or online. Very complicated to update the firmware. Awkward to reset the radio.

UBC800XLT(Base/Mobile):
Pros- A
European/Australian version of a mix between the BCT-15 and BCD996T with the 3 'Band plans'. With dynamic memory, GPS compatibility, Multi-site trunking, selectable startup configuration, a signal meter, VHF/UHF trunking, I-call monitoring, status bits, computer interface/control, audio alerts, alpha-tagging, priority plus scanning, priority plus IDs, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, 100 quick keys, 6000 possible (tagged) channels; 250 channels/IDs per group, 20 groups per system, and/or 500 systems,  NFM (including EDACS), Close Call with DND, 10 Close Call monitor memories, (selected service/custom) Scan with Search simultaneously, 6 'search' keys, temporary lockouts, repeater reverse, autostore, 'Quick search, broadcast screen with 10 custom screen bands, Military air, Fire Toneout, 9 different alert tone patterns with independent volume, and automatic channel step.

Cons- Scans multiple trunking systems slow. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels). No priority ID scanning. Awkward to reset the radio.

PSR310(HH)/PSR410(Base/Mobile):
Pros-
Object Oriented Memory with 22 Scan Lists (20 regular lists, a Favorites list and Skywarn list), 5 way navigation key to access special modes and programming options, Multi-Site Trunking with option to look for the site with the best received CC decode rate, 700MHz and 380MHz trunking, Military air, computer interface and control, QuickText allows you to program insertable text for tagging, 'bold' text option, object hit counts, FlexStep allows channel entries within 1.25 KHz steps, support for EDACS ESK systems, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, weather alert/priority, per channel or global attenuation, ID delay, priority IDs, patch tracking, the repeater finder tool, pre-programmed systems, Wide/Narrow/SCAT EDACS, I-call IDs, radio IDs, 'any' color LED alert, audio alerts, signal strength meter, battery meter, favorites scan list, 'Expert' settings, 'multiple' priority channels, Scan with Search, Spectrum Sweeper, limit, service, and Sweeper searches can be programmed as objects, temp/permanent lockout, Zeromatic search tuning, 'Tune' search, control-channel data output, and firmware upgrades. Many extra 'fine tuning' settings for scanning and especially trunking.

Cons- Same as the PSR500/600.

PSR700(HH):
Pros- A 'mini' handheld
Object Orientated Memory scanner with some outstanding features that contains the Radio Reference Database on a 2 GB standard SD card or room for about 10 million objects, included software, 51 Scan Lists (50 regular lists plus a Skywarn list), 4-way navigation key to access special modes and programming options, Spectrum Sweeper, Multi-Site Trunking, Virtual Scanner Memory Management system with 200 V-Scanner II folders, simplified keypad more like an MP3 player, software/USB cable included, weather alert/priority, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, audio alerts, visual alerts (flashing display), Military air, support for EDACS ESK systems, Multi-Site Trunking, adjustable priority sampling interval, signal meter, private/radio IDs, I-call IDs, temp/permanent lockout, ID delay, patch tracking, 75 cps scan rate, 85 steps/sec. search rate, and USB power (as well as AC/DC). Software required to update the database and firmware or to manually program.

Cons- Software needed to edit trunked systems and manage V-Scanner II folders. No lockout button.
No numeric keypad. Canada not included in database. Removal of the SD card (and batteries) required and a card reader to upload/download to scanner.

BR330T
(HH):
Pros-
With dynamic memory, a signal meter, 99 quick keys, Race Track Operation, 100 kHz - 1.3 GHz reception, an AM bar antenna, VHF/UHF trunking, I-call monitoring, Motorola status bits, computer interface, audio alerts, alpha-tagging, priority plus scanning, CTCSS/DCS tone codes, 1600 possible (tagged) channels; 200 channels per group, 20 groups per system, and/or 400 systems, NFM (including EDACS), Close Call with DND, swivel beltclip, (selected service/custom) Scan with Search simultaneously, Military air, repeater reverse, autostore, broadcast screen with 10 custom screen bands, Fire Toneout, 9 different alert tone patterns with independent volume, (analog) TV and AM/FM service searches, automatic channel step, and a SMA antenna (w/BNC adapter).

Cons-
Long squelch tail leaves distinctive 'chop' at the end of transmissions. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels).

Conventional Scanners

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SC230(HH):
Pros- About 1600 tagged channels,
Dynamic Memory, 200 systems, 100 cps scan rate, Close Call, Race Track Operation (with pre-programmed races), repeater reverse, audio channel alerts, auto-store, Conventional priority scan, priority plus scan, and PC control.

Cons- Only 10 'Quick Keys'. No Military air. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels).

UBC3500XLT(HH):
Pros-  European version of the BR330T without trunking, AM bar antenna, 100 kHz-25 MHz range, and
Race Track Operation. Nice features are 1600 tagged channels, 100 'Quick Keys', Close Call, Fire Toneout, 10 limit searches, autostore, Priority/Priority Plus scan, and PC control/clone.

Cons- Scans multiple trunking systems slow. Channel delay set by system (all groups/channels). Very complicated to update the firmware. Awkward to reset the radio.
Only 1 service search (Air), with 8.33 or 12.5 kHz steps.

BC3000XLT(HH):
Pros- 400 channels/20 banks,
100 cps scan rate, 25-1300MHz range, 10 priority channels, 2 or 4 second delay, auto-store, auto-sort, weather radio, and changeable steps/modes.

Cons- Battery pack. No alpha-tagging.

Pro-2042(Base/Mobile):
Pros- 1000 channels/10 banks, 50 cps scan rate, 25-1300MHz range, auto-store, auto-sort, changeable steps/modes,
lock-out review, 100 Monitor Memories, tape out jack, rotary control, 10 limit searches, direct search, AC/12VDC power, optional computer control software, global attenuation (only), and weather radio.

Cons- No alpha-tagging. Only 1 priority channel. No CTCSS codes.

BC9000XLT(Base/Mobile):
Pros- 500 channels/20 banks, 100 cps scan rate, 25-1300MHz range, auto-store, auto-sort, auto-recording, changeable steps/modes,
10 priority channels, alpha tagging, tape out jack, rotary control, direct search, AC/12VDC power, hit counts, optional CTCSS board, per-channel attenuation, and keypad lock.

Cons- No weather radio. Only 250 alpha-tag channels in 10 banks.

Wide-Band Scanners

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Icom IC-R6(HH):
Pros- 1300 channels/22 banks, pocket-size, 100 kHz-1300 MHz range, an AM bar antenna, reviews report about 40-50 cps scan rate (selected channels), rotary control, 25 limit searches, CTCSS/DCS tones w/lockouts,
per-channel attenuation, signal meter, 6-character alpha tagging, auto-store, adjustable delay/resume, changeable steps/modes, AC/DC power, weather radio/alert, auto-power-off, pocket guide, and optional computer control software.

Cons- No 7.5 kHz  tuning step.

Icom IC-R
7(HH):
Pros- 1600 channels located in 26 'categories' and 100 'groups'. cell phone-size, 150 kHz-1300 MHz range, an AM bar antenna,
preset channels for ham radio, air band, railroads, car racing, reviews report about 40-50 cps scan rate (selected channels), rotary control, 25 limit searches, CTCSS/DCS tones w/lockouts, per-channel attenuation, signal meter, 16-character alpha tagging, auto-store, adjustable delay/resume, changeable steps/modes, AC/DC power, weather radio/alert, auto-power-off, pocket guide, and optional CS-RX7 software.

Cons- Li-Ion
battery pack or (bulky, expensive) AA battery back.

Icom IC-R20(HH):

Pros-

Cons-

Icom IC-R1500
(PC/Mobile):
Pros-

Cons-

AOR AR8200MKIII(HH):
Pros-

Cons-

Yupiteru MVT-7100/7200(HH):
Pros- Super-sensitivity,

Cons-

AOR AR8600MKII(Base/Mobile):
Pros-

Cons-
 

Trunking Radios With Popular Features

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Conventional Radios With Popular Features-under construction

 

 
Wide-Band Radios With Popular Features-under construction

 

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Last updated
September 26, 2014
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